IHSA

The International Humanitarian Studies Association is a network engaged with the study of humanitarian crises caused by natural disaster, conflict or political instability.

What do Practitioners Really Need from Academics? Searching for Best Practices

Submitted by Martin Quack, Peter Heintze
In theme Humanitarian Studies and the WHS Humanitarian Scholar Commitments

An expanding humanitarian enterprise in a changing political context needs more interactive analy-sis. This panel brings together examples of cross sector knowledge exchange that contribute to better humanitarian action. While there are frequent discussions with practitioners and academics it remains a challenge to have in depth reflection or learning, where the involvement of academics is efficiently used for better results. In recent years, several new initiatives by humanitarian actors have started in different countries. In Europe for instance there are several new NGO initiatives for reflection, analysis, cross-sectoral knowledge exchange and training. The focus of this panel is on such new initiatives to reshape reflection and learning in a changing humanitarian context.
This panel will focus on the 1. WHS Humanitarian Scholar Commitment on collaborative and inclusive research: 1. We commit to make humanitarian research more collaborative and inclusive, especially with non-traditional knowledge actors and affected communities, and to ensure that knowledge is relevant to policy and practice.
We ask, in what ways humanitarian research can become more collaborative and useful for humanitarian practice. This includes searching for experiences with the 4. Commitment on localising humanitarian research and the 5. Commitment to increase the use of humanitarian research by cross-sectoral knowledge exchange.
We are looking for academic papers as well as for practical examples. There will be space for ex-change among the initiatives and interaction with participants. We especially invite contributions from recent civil society initiatives on reflection and analysis.

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