Paper: The gender dimension of the climate change-induced livestock migration in Tanzania

Paper details

Paper authors Ronald Ndesanjo
In panel on Climate-Related Displacement, (Internal) Migration and Humanitarian Action
Paper presenter(s) will be presenting In-Person / Online

Abstract

Climate change-driven pastoral mobility poses several challenges to migrants such as food and health insecurity. This study aimed to assess effects on the gender dimension of the climate change-induced livestock migration in Tanzania by examining in what ways women, men, girls, and boys are differently impacted. The study used a mixed-method design. Using Key Informant Interviews (n=24), Focused Group Discussions (n=16), and household survey (n=363), data were collected in four villages from four districts in the regions of Mwanza, Shinyanga, Katavi and Kigoma. Content analysis and inferential statistical analysis were used. It was found that about 33% of households (n=207) in destination areas noted that children cannot access health services. Regarding access to clean and safe water among children, 33% of the households noted that they (children) don’t have access. About 44% and 36% of the households noted that women and the elderly don’t have access to clean and safe water respectively. As adverse impacts of climate change unfold, more pastoralists are likely to succumb to the pressure to migrate consequently disconnecting them from access to basic services. The findings will contribute to policy recommendations to better manage pastoral mobility by ensuring guaranteed access to basic services among migrant herders.

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Presenters

Ronald Ndesanjo